ASPECTS OF THE HINDLIMB MORPHOLOGY OF SOME AUSTRALIAN BIRDS OF PREY: A COMPARATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE STUDY

@inproceedings{Einoder2007ASPECTSOT,
  title={ASPECTS OF THE HINDLIMB MORPHOLOGY OF SOME AUSTRALIAN BIRDS OF PREY: A COMPARATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE STUDY},
  author={Luke D Einoder and Alastair M. M. Richardson},
  year={2007}
}
Abstract We quantified the extent of adaptive radiation in the evolution of the hindlimb in the bird-of-prey community on Tasmania. Assessments of the ecological capabilities of raptor species are often based on a visual inspection of their hindlimb structure, with little recourse to direct biomechanical or functional evidence. We examined the links between hindlimb structure and patterns of diet, foraging, and habitat use in raptors by analytically investigating tarsus, toe, and talon… 

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TLDR
This work set out to find a tool that allows for the determination of toe (I‐IV) and hindlimb (left or right) identity, and established qualitative and quantitative differences and similarities among talons lacking the keratin sheath in diurnal raptors.

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