ARE WE ALL LESS RISKY AND MORE SKILLFUL THAN OUR FELLOW DRIVERS

@article{Svenson1981AREWA,
  title={ARE WE ALL LESS RISKY AND MORE SKILLFUL THAN OUR FELLOW DRIVERS},
  author={Ola Svenson},
  journal={Acta Psychologica},
  year={1981},
  volume={47},
  pages={143-148}
}
  • O. Svenson
  • Published 1 February 1981
  • Psychology
  • Acta Psychologica
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TLDR
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Numerous studies have shown that drivers are overconfident and have inaccurate perceptions of their driving ability. There is evidence to suggest the skills needed to accurately assess performance
What Do People Think About the Risks of Driving? Implications for Traffic Safety Interventions1
Two studies found that people generally think of themselves as better than average drivers. Both older and younger people rated themselves slightly better than peers, with the younger people rating
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