ANTLER SIZE IN RED DEER: HERITABILITY AND SELECTION BUT NO EVOLUTION

@article{Kruuk2002ANTLERSI,
  title={ANTLER SIZE IN RED DEER: HERITABILITY AND SELECTION BUT NO EVOLUTION},
  author={Loeske E. B. Kruuk and Jon Slate and Josephine M. Pemberton and Susan Brotherstone and Fiona E. Guinness and Tim H. Clutton-Brock},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2002},
  volume={56}
}
Abstract We present estimates of the selection on and the heritability of a male secondary sexual weapon in a wild population: antler size in red deer. Male red deer with large antlers had increased lifetime breeding success, both before and after correcting for body size, generating a standardized selection gradient of 0.44 (±0.18 SE). Despite substantial age‐ and environment‐related variation, antler size was also heritable (heritability of antler mass =0.33 ±0.12). However the observed… Expand
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