ANTIANDROGEN THERAPY IN DERMATOLOGY

@article{Shaw1996ANTIANDROGENTI,
  title={ANTIANDROGEN THERAPY IN DERMATOLOGY},
  author={James C. Shaw},
  journal={International Journal of Dermatology},
  year={1996},
  volume={35}
}
  • J. C. Shaw
  • Published 1996
  • Medicine
  • International Journal of Dermatology
The term "antiandrogen" usually refers to androgen receptor blockers in target tissue, of which there are two types: (1) steroidal antiandrogens that include spironolactone and cyproterone acetate, and (2) nonsteroidal antiandrogens such as flutamide, nilutamide, and casodex. In addition to these, several drugs result in a net reduction of androgen expression (Table 2) and represent itnportant therapeutic options in the treattnent of androgen-mediated skin disease. Among these are oral… Expand
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  • J. C. Shaw
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
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TLDR
The use of spironolactone as an antiandrogen in dermatologic therapy is reviewed, the endocrinologic effects, pharmacology, dermatologic uses, and side effects are discussed, and guidelines for its use are provided. Expand
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TLDR
Treatment with the antiandrogen flutamide and an oral contraceptive resulted in a particularly rapid and marked decrease in the total hirsutism score, which reached the normal range at 7 months. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Following termination of the medication, the various symptoms of virilism reappeared more or less quickly and markedly in the majority of the patients unless they are placed on oral contraceptives containing a derivative of 17-acetoxyprogesterone. Expand
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