AN EYE FOR DETAIL: SELECTIVE SEXUAL IMPRINTING IN ZEBRA FINCHES

@inproceedings{Burley2006ANEF,
  title={AN EYE FOR DETAIL: SELECTIVE SEXUAL IMPRINTING IN ZEBRA FINCHES},
  author={Nancy Tyler Burley},
  booktitle={Evolution; international journal of organic evolution},
  year={2006}
}
  • N. Burley
  • Published in
    Evolution; international…
    1 May 2006
  • Biology, Psychology
Abstract To investigate the idea that sexual imprinting creates incipient reproductive isolation between phenotypically diverging populations, I performed experiments to determine whether colony-reared zebra finches would imprint on details of artificial white crests. In the first experiment, adults in one breeding colony wore white crests with a vertical black stripe, while in another colony adults wore crests having a horizontal black stripe; except for their crests, breeders possessed wild… 
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