AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CO-EVOLUTION BETWEEN THE CUCKOO, CUCULUS CANORUS, AND ITS HOSTS. II. HOST EGG MARKINGS, CHICK DISCRIMINATION AND GENERAL DISCUSSION

@article{Davies1989ANES,
  title={AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CO-EVOLUTION BETWEEN THE CUCKOO, CUCULUS CANORUS, AND ITS HOSTS. II. HOST EGG MARKINGS, CHICK DISCRIMINATION AND GENERAL DISCUSSION},
  author={Nigel Davies and Michael de L. Brooke},
  journal={Journal of Animal Ecology},
  year={1989},
  volume={58},
  pages={225-236}
}
SUMMARY (1) There was no difference in the distinctiveness of egg markings between species that have interacted strongly with cuckoos and species that have not, nor in intra-clutch variation, nor in inter-clutch variation within a species. In Iceland, where they are isolated from cuckoos, the eggs of meadow pipits and pied/white wagtails showed no differences in intra-clutch variation, nor inter-clutch variation, from those in parasitized populations in Britain. Thus there was no evidence that… 

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AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CO-EVOLUTION BETWEEN THE CUCKOO, CUCULUS CANORUS, AND ITS HOSTS. I. HOST EGG DISCRIMINATION
TLDR
Three results suggest that the egg discrimination by suitable hosts has evolved in response to cuckoo parasitism, and Species unsuitable as hosts mainly showed little if any rejection of model eggs unlike their own.
Heavy Brood Parasitism by the Common Cuckoo Cuculus canorus on the Azure-winged Magpie Cyanopica cyana
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Azure-winged Magpies suffered heavy brood parasitism by Common Cuckoos probably because of the short history of the host-parasite relationship between them, which is as a result of a recent expansion of their breeding areas in Nagano Prefecture.
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The objectives of this study were to determine the frequency of occurrence of these various responses by Yellow Warblers to naturally deposited cowbird eggs and to investigate the factors eliciting each response.
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It is shown by experiment that host discrimination against badly matching eggs is a selective force in gens maintenance and that cuckoos lay a better mimetic egg where the host species is apparently more discriminating.
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TLDR
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