AN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF THE EVOLUTION OF VIRULENCE UNDER BOTH HORIZONTAL AND VERTICAL TRANSMISSION

@inproceedings{Stewart2005ANES,
  title={AN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF THE EVOLUTION OF VIRULENCE UNDER BOTH HORIZONTAL AND VERTICAL TRANSMISSION},
  author={Andrew D Stewart and John M. Logsdon and Stephen E. Kelley},
  booktitle={Evolution; international journal of organic evolution},
  year={2005}
}
Abstract According to current thinking, a parasite's transmission mode will be a major determinant of virulence, defined as the harm induced by parasites to their hosts. With horizontal transmission, virulence will increase as a byproduct of a trade-off between fitness gained through increased among-host transmission (infectivity) and fitness lost through increased virulence. With vertical transmission, virulence will decrease because a parasite's reproductive potential will be maximized only… 

HOST GROWTH CONDITIONS INFLUENCE EXPERIMENTAL EVOLUTION OF LIFE HISTORY AND VIRULENCE OF A PARASITE WITH VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL TRANSMISSION

Experimental populations of the protozoan Paramecium caudatum and its bacterial parasite Holospora undulata tested showed how environmentally driven changes in host demography can promote evolutionary divergence of parasite life history and transmission strategies.

Condition-dependent virulence in a horizontally and vertically transmitted bacterial parasite

It is suggested that virulence is not a constant property of the parasite, and that a single (and simple) relationship between virulence and transmission does not exist.

Vertical Transmission Selects for Reduced Virulence in a Plant Virus and for Increased Resistance in the Host

Evidence is provided of the key role that the interplay between mode of transmission and host-parasite co-evolution has in determining the evolution of virulence in plant virus Cucumber mosaic virus in its natural host Arabidopsis thaliana.

Virulence and transmission modes in metapopulations: when group selection increases virulence.

Long‐term selection experiment produces breakdown of horizontal transmissibility in parasite with mixed transmission mode

This work explains the loss of horizontal transmissibility by epidemiological feedbacks and resistance evolution, reducing the frequency of susceptible hosts in the population and thereby decreasing the selective advantage of horizontal transmission.

The impact of transmission mode on the evolution of benefits provided by microbial symbionts

The surprising result that vertical transmission can inhibit the evolution of benefits provided by symbionts to hosts when horizontal transmission and symbiont-provided benefits are positively correlated is found.

Diversification of Transmission Modes and the Evolution of Mutualism

This article investigates how symbionts’ transmission mode and virulence should evolve, depending on the relationship between these two traits, and shows that the force that stabilizes mutualism in such situations is the competition for transmission between symbiont.

Host genotype and environment affect the trade-off between horizontal and vertical transmission of the parasite Edhazardia aedis

Since horizontal transmission is linked to higher virulence than vertical transmission, the host’s contribution to transmission mode has important consequences for the evolution of parasites with mixed-mode transmission.

Erratum to: Role of trade-off between sexual and vertical routes for evolution of pathogen transmission

It is shown that the shape of the trade-off between the two transmission modes significantly affects pathogen evolution, and while vertical transmission dominates for concave and sigmoid trade-offs, sexual transmission is most commonly observed under convextrade-offs.
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 45 REFERENCES

THE EVOLUTION OF VIRULENCE IN PATHOGENS WITH VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL TRANSMISSION

A population‐dynamical model for the evolution of virulence when both vertical and horizontal transmission are present is presented and the notion of a virulence‐avirulence continuum between horizontal and vertical transmission is argued against.

TRADEOFF BETWEEN HORIZONTAL AND VERTICAL MODES OF TRANSMISSION IN BACTERIAL PLASMIDS

The tradeoff hypothesis, which predicts that the density of uninfected hosts in the environment should determine the optimum balance between modes of parasite transmission, and evolutionary predictions using conjugative plasmids and the bacteria that they infect are tested.

Potential versus actual contribution of vertical transmission to pathogen fitness

Investigating the effective contribution of vertical and horizontal transmission to the genetic structure of three natural populations of A. hypoxylon found high genotypic diversity and low linkage disequilibrium, indicating that most established genotypes are derived from horizontally transmitted, sexual spores.

Vertical transmission and evolution of mutualism from parasitism

Abstract Using an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) model, it is shown that vertical transmission, defined as the direct transfer of infection from a parent host to its progeny, is an important

Ectoparasite virulence is linked to mode of transmission

  • D. ClaytonD. Tompkins
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1994
Compared the virulence of lice and mites infesting a single group of captive rock doves, results support the hypothesis that ectoparasite virulence is linked to the mode of transmission.

Trade‐off between Virulence and Vertical Transmission and the Maintenance of a Virulent Plant Pathogen

A trade‐off between virulence and vertical transmission is demonstrated, explaining the maintenance of more virulent, completely castrating fungal genotypes in natural populations, and suggest that vertical transmission in plants is more complex than what is considered in current models.

Superinfection and the evolution of parasite virulence.

The equivalence between the 'superinfection model' and recent approaches to the study of the meta-population dynamics of multi-species interactions is noted, and the maximum level of virulence that can be maintained by superinfection is calculated.

SELECTION OF BENEVOLENCE IN A HOST–PARASITE SYSTEM

When cells harboring different variants of these phage were cultured so that no infectious spread was allowed, ensuring that all parasite transmission was vertical, selection favored the variants that were most benevolent to the host—those that least harmed host growth rate.

Superinfection and the evolution of parasite virulence

  • M. NowakR. May
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1994
The equilibrium distribution of parasite strains and the maximum level of virulence that can be maintained by superinfection are calculated and the equivalence between the model and recent approaches to the study of the meta-population dynamics of multispecies interactions is noted.

The population dynamics of vertically and horizontally transmitted parasites

We analyse a model of the transmission dynamics of a parasite transmitted both vertically and horizontally. The basic reproductive ratio (R0) of the parasite is shown to be a sum of horizontal and