AN ADMIXTURE SIGNAL IN ARMENIANS AROUND THE END OF THE BRONZE AGE REVEALS WIDESPREAD POPULATION MOVEMENT ACROSS THE MIDDLE EAST

@article{Hovhannisyan2020ANAS,
  title={AN ADMIXTURE SIGNAL IN ARMENIANS AROUND THE END OF THE BRONZE AGE REVEALS WIDESPREAD POPULATION MOVEMENT ACROSS THE MIDDLE EAST},
  author={Anahit Hovhannisyan and Eppie R. Jones and Pierpaolo Maisano Delser and Joshua G. Schraiber and Anna Hakobyan and Ashot Margaryan and Peter Hrechdakian and Hovhannes Sahakyan and Lehti Saag and Zaruhi A. Khachatryan and Levon Yepiskoposyan and Andrea Manica},
  journal={bioRxiv},
  year={2020}
}
The Armenians, a population inhabiting the region in West Asia known as the Armenian Highland, has been argued to show a remarkable degree of population continuity since the Early Neolithic. Here we test the degree of continuity of this population as well as its plausible origin, by collating modern and ancient genomic data, and adding a number of novel contemporary genomes. We show that Armenians have indeed remained unadmixed through the Neolithic and at least until the first part of the… 

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