ALDEN, an Algorithm for Assessment of Drug Causality in Stevens–Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis: Comparison With Case–Control Analysis

@article{Sassolas2010ALDENAA,
  title={ALDEN, an Algorithm for Assessment of Drug Causality in Stevens–Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis: Comparison With Case–Control Analysis},
  author={B Sassolas and Cynthia Haddad and M. Mockenhaupt and Ariane Dunant and Yvonne Liss and Konrad Bork and U F Haustein and Dieter Vieluf and Jean Claude Roujeau and Herv{\'e} Le Louet},
  journal={Clinical Pharmacology \& Therapeutics},
  year={2010},
  volume={88}
}
Epidermal necrolysis (EN)--either Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) or toxic EN (TEN)--is a severe drug reaction. [...] Key Method ALDEN causality scores were compared with those from the French pharmacovigilance method in 100 cases and the case-control results of the EuroSCAR study. Scores attributed by ALDEN segregated widely. ALDEN pointed to a "probable" or "very probable" causality in 69/100 cases as compared to 23/100 with the French method (P < 0.001). It scored "very unlikely" causality for 64% of…Expand
Is acetaminophen associated with a risk of Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis? Analysis of the French Pharmacovigilance Database
TLDR
Analysis of the French pharmacovigilance data using the ALDEN algorithm found no obvious SJS/TEN risk related to the use of acetaminophen in this large national series.
Adverse drug reaction causality assessment tools for drug-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: room for improvement
TLDR
Development of an enhanced tool that can incorporate data from immunological testing and pharmacogenetic results may strengthen CAT usefulness and applicability for drug-induced SJS/TEN.
Risk of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis associated with anticonvulsants in a Japanese population: Matched case-control and cohort studies.
TLDR
This study is the first to document the differential risk of SJS/TEN for anticonvulsants in a real-world setting in Japan.
Stevens–Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis: Are Drug Dictionaries Correctly Informing Physicians Regarding the Risk?
TLDR
Information on the risk of SJS/TEN in drug dictionaries needs improvement to enhance the quality of advice given by general physicians and to raise the understanding of risk by patients.
The Medication Risk of Stevens–Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis in Asians: The Major Drug Causality and Comparison With the US FDA Label
TLDR
Only one acetaminophen‐induced SJS was identified, while several medications labeled as carrying a risk of SJS/TEN by the FDA were not found to have caused any of the cases in the Asian countries investigated in this study.
Searching for the culprit drugs for Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis from a Nationwide Claim Database in Korea.
  • Min-Suk Yang, Jin Yong Lee, +7 authors Hye-Ryun Kang
  • Medicine
    The journal of allergy and clinical immunology. In practice
  • 2019
TLDR
The ALDEN score was applied to the claims database to identify possible culprit drugs for SJS and TEN in South Korea by applying an algorithm for assessment of drug causality for epidermal necrolysis (ALDEN) in a nationwide administrative database.
Stevens–Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis in Association with Commonly Prescribed Drugs in Outpatient Care Other than Anti-Epileptic Drugs and Antibiotics: A Population-Based Case–Control Study
TLDR
Most likely causal associations between Stevens–Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis and use of allopurinol, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, and 5-aminosalicylates are observed, and potential associations for proton pump inhibitors, fluoxetine, and mirtazapine are found.
Incidence of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis among new users of different individual drugs in a European population: a case-population study
TLDR
Phenytoin was the drug with the highest incidence of SJS/TEN, followed by allopurinol and cotrimoxazole, and for the rest of the drugs, the estimated incidences were below 1 in 100,000 new users.
Drug‐induced liver injury associated with stevens‐Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis: Patient characteristics, causes, and outcome in 36 cases
The liver and skin are the organs most commonly involved in serious adverse drug reactions. Rarely a drug reaction can affect both organs concurrently. The association of drug‐induced liver injury
Antibiotic Drug Use and the Risk of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.
TLDR
A strong association between SJS/TEN and trimethoprim alone is observed, which suggests that the previously reported association between cotrimoxazole and SJS-TEN is at least partly attributable to the non-sulphonamide antibiotic trimethOPrim, which is frequently prescribed as a single agent in the UK.
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