Corpus ID: 51749934

AILY BINGEING ON SUGAR REPEATEDLY RELEASES DOPAMINE IN HE ACCUMBENS SHELL

@inproceedings{Avenaa2005AILYBO,
  title={AILY BINGEING ON SUGAR REPEATEDLY RELEASES DOPAMINE IN HE ACCUMBENS SHELL},
  author={N. M. Avenaa and B. G. Hoebela},
  year={2005}
}
bstract—Most drugs of abuse increase dopamine (DA) in he nucleus accumbens (NAc), and do so every time as a harmacological response. Palatable food also releases acumbens-shell DA, but in naïve rats the effect can wane uring a long meal and disappears with repetition. Under elect dietary circumstances, sugar can have effects similar o a drug of abuse. Rats show signs of DA sensitization and pioid dependence when given intermittent access to surose, such as alterations in DA and mu-opioid… Expand

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