AIDS Conspiracy Beliefs and Unsafe Sex in Cape Town

@article{Grebe2011AIDSCB,
  title={AIDS Conspiracy Beliefs and Unsafe Sex in Cape Town},
  author={Eduard Grebe and Nicoli Nattrass},
  journal={AIDS and Behavior},
  year={2011},
  volume={16},
  pages={761-773}
}
This paper uses multivariate logistic regressions to explore: (1) potential socio-economic, cultural, psychological and political determinants of AIDS conspiracy beliefs among young adults in Cape Town; and (2) whether these beliefs matter for unsafe sex. Membership of a religious organisation reduced the odds of believing AIDS origin conspiracy theories by more than a third, whereas serious psychological distress more than doubled it and belief in witchcraft tripled the odds among Africans… 
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