• Corpus ID: 26130257

AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS AND FOOD PATTERNS.

@article{Mcmartin1964AGRICULTURALSA,
  title={AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS AND FOOD PATTERNS.},
  author={A. Mcmartin},
  journal={South African medical journal = Suid-Afrikaanse tydskrif vir geneeskunde},
  year={1964},
  volume={38},
  pages={
          625-8
        }
}
  • A. Mcmartin
  • Published 22 August 1964
  • Economics
  • South African medical journal = Suid-Afrikaanse tydskrif vir geneeskunde
7 Citations
Donut Stones as Thigh-Supported Spindle Whorls: Evidence of Ancient Maya Household Yarn and Cordage Production
Abstract Donut stones are a relatively common class of ground stone artifact found at archaeological sites throughout Mesoamerica and Andean South America, and a variety of functional interpretations
Gender, Farming, and Long‐Term Change
  • C. Robin
  • Sociology
    Current Anthropology
  • 2006
A reassessment of ethnographic, ethnohistoric, and archaeological evidence documents variation in Maya agricultural technologies across time and space and change in the social relations of farming
AGRICULTURAL POLE RITUALS AND RULERSHIP IN LATE FORMATIVE CENTRAL JALISCO
Recent research into the Teuchitlan tradition continues to improve our understanding of western Mexico's relationship to the rest of Mesoamerica. The tradition is defined on the basis of its
Women, Horticulture, and Society in Sub‐Saharan Africa
Considerable power was probably available to either sex earlier in human history. Males were largely concerned with the prestige sphere based on control of special goods usually involving mobility
Deutung von Orts- und Flurnetzen im Hochland von Mexiko als kultreligiöse Reliktformen altindianischer Besiedlung
Coutts, H. H.: Rainfall of the Kilimanjaro area, Weather, Vol. 24, p. 66-69, 1969. East Africa Royal Comission: Report for 1953-1955, Lon don, p. 252-254 and Map. 3, 1961. Findlater, J.: Mean monthly
Food-Producing Systems Available to the Ancient Maya
Abstract Discussion on the subsistence base of the ancient Maya has centered mainly around the potentialities and limitations of shifting cultivation. The case for alternative and more intensive