ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF BANK SWALLOW (RIPARIA RIPARIA) COLONIALITY

@article{Hoogland1976ADVANTAGESAD,
  title={ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF BANK SWALLOW (RIPARIA RIPARIA) COLONIALITY},
  author={John L Hoogland and Paul W. Sherman},
  journal={Ecological Monographs},
  year={1976},
  volume={46},
  pages={33-58}
}
We studied the advantages and disadvantages of Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia) coloniality in 1972 and 1973 by examining 54 colonies, ranging in size from 2 to 451 active nests, near Ann Arbor, Michigan USA. Four disadvantages were investigated: (I) increased competition for nest burrows and nest building materials, (2) increased competition for mates and matings, (3) increased possibilities of misdirected parental care because of either brood parasitism or the mixing tip of unrelated young. and… 
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It is suggested that colonial breeders benefited from the social stimulation of simultaneous feeding in first broods, but the advantage of synchronicity in feeding declined in second broods and the sparser breeding spacing of solitary parents was more advantageous for feeding in second and third broods.
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  • 1981
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A model is presented that uses selection factors to predict the optimal colony size for Ciconiiformes, and the advantages of mixed-species heronries to individuals include minimizing nest competition and food competition, while maximizing anti-predator behavior and increasing social interactions and information transfer.
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