ADHD and retrieval-induced forgetting: Evidence for a deficit in the inhibitory control of memory

@article{Storm2010ADHDAR,
  title={ADHD and retrieval-induced forgetting: Evidence for a deficit in the inhibitory control of memory},
  author={Benjamin C Storm and Holly A. White},
  journal={Memory},
  year={2010},
  volume={18},
  pages={265 - 271}
}
Research on retrieval-induced forgetting has shown that the selective retrieval of some information can cause the forgetting of other information. Such forgetting is believed to result from inhibitory processes that function to resolve interference during retrieval. The current study examined whether individuals with ADHD demonstrate normal levels of retrieval-induced forgetting. A total of 40 adults with ADHD and 40 adults without ADHD participated in a standard retrieval-induced forgetting… 
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  • Alp Aslan, K. Bäuml
  • Psychology
    Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition
  • 2011
TLDR
The role of working memory capacity (WMC) in young adults' retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) is examined and a positive relationship between WMC and RIF is revealed, which supports the inhibitory executive-control account of RIF.
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