AAC for adults with acquired neurological conditions: A review

@article{Beukelman2007AACFA,
  title={AAC for adults with acquired neurological conditions: A review},
  author={David R. Beukelman and Susan Fager and Laura J. Ball and Aimee R. Dietz},
  journal={Augmentative and Alternative Communication},
  year={2007},
  volume={23},
  pages={230 - 242}
}
The purpose of this review is to describe the state of the science of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) for adults with acquired neurogenic communication disorders. Recent advances in AAC for six groups of people with degenerative and chronic acquired neurological conditions are detailed. Specifically, the topics of recent AAC technological advances, acceptance, use, limitations, and future needs of individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), traumatic brain injury (TBI… Expand
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