A weight-neutral versus weight-loss approach for health promotion in women with high BMI: A randomized-controlled trial

@article{Mensinger2016AWV,
  title={A weight-neutral versus weight-loss approach for health promotion in women with high BMI: A randomized-controlled trial},
  author={Janell L. Mensinger and Rachel M. Calogero and Saverio Stranges and Tracy L. Tylka},
  journal={Appetite},
  year={2016},
  volume={105},
  pages={364-374}
}

Figures and Tables from this paper

Weight-neutral interventions in young people with high body mass index: A systematic review.
TLDR
Weight-neutral interventions may be feasible and acceptable in adolescents with overweight/obesity in the short term (≤12 weeks), but data are limited.
A Comprehensive Critical Assessment of Increased Fruit and Vegetable Intake on Weight Loss in Women
TLDR
Consistent evidence from prospective studies and RCTs shows that increased intake of FV is a chief contributor to weight loss in women, and this effect is enhanced with concurrent dietary restriction of high energy density (ED) or high-fat foods.
Effects of a new intervention based on the Health at Every Size approach for the management of obesity: The “Health and Wellness in Obesity” study
TLDR
The results show that this new intensified HAES®,-based intervention improved participants’ eating attitudes and practices, perception of body image, physical capacity, and health-related quality of life despite the lack of changes in body weight and physical activity levels, showing that this novel approach was superior to a traditional HAES®-based program.
Secondary-prevention behaviour-change strategy for high-risk patients: Benefits for all classes of body mass index.
TLDR
The results support dietitian-led multidisciplinary lifestyle interventions forMultidisciplinary management of high-risk patients of all BMI classes.
Identification of Barriers to Adherence to a Weight Loss Diet in Women Using the Nominal Group Technique
TLDR
A deeper understanding of barriers women find most salient to adhering to a weight loss diet is offered, providing direction for the clinical application of weight loss programs.
Does weight management research for adults with severe obesity represent them? Analysis of systematic review data
TLDR
Although limited by poor trial reporting, the results indicate inadequate representation of people most at risk of obesity and guidance for considering underserved groups may improve the appropriateness of research and inform greater engagement with health and social care services.
Effects of weight-neutral approaches compared with traditional weight-loss approaches on behavioral, physical, and psychological health outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
TLDR
Weight-neutral approaches may be as effective as weight-loss methods for improving physical, psychological, and behavioral outcomes, but no significant differences were observed for any other outcome.
Bariatric surgery, lifestyle interventions and orlistat for severe obesity: the REBALANCE mixed-methods systematic review and economic evaluation.
TLDR
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass was costly to deliver, but it was the most cost-effective intervention, and most WMPs were cost- effective compared with current population obesity trends.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 77 REFERENCES
Systematic review of long-term weight loss studies in obese adults: clinical significance and applicability to clinical practice
TLDR
Dietary/lifestyle and pharmacologic weight loss interventions provide modest weight loss, and may improve markers of cardiovascular risk factors although these benefits occur mainly in patients with cardiovascular risks.
Mediators of Weight Loss and Weight Loss Maintenance in Middle‐aged Women
TLDR
Results show that lowering emotional eating and adopting a flexible dietary restraint pattern are critical for sustained weight loss, and interventions must also be effective in promoting exercise intrinsic motivation and self‐efficacy.
Long-term Effects of Dieting: Is Weight Loss Related to Health?
TLDR
Whether weight loss improves health by reviewing health outcomes of long-term randomized controlled diet studies is evaluated and factors that potentially confound the relationship between weight loss and health outcomes are discussed, including increased exercise, healthier eating, and engagement with the health care system.
Size acceptance and intuitive eating improve health for obese, female chronic dieters.
Comparison of the Atkins, Zone, Ornish, and LEARN diets for change in weight and related risk factors among overweight premenopausal women: the A TO Z Weight Loss Study: a randomized trial.
TLDR
The Atkins diet, which had the lowest carbohydrate intake, lost more weight at 12 months than women assigned to follow the Zone diet, and had experienced comparable or more favorable metabolic effects than those assigned to the Zone, Ornish, or LEARN diets.
Evaluating a ‘non-diet’ wellness intervention for improvement of metabolic fitness, psychological well-being and eating and activity behaviors
TLDR
Over a 1 y period, a diet approach results in weight loss for those who complete the intervention, while a non-diet approach does not, however, anon-d diet approach can produce similar improvements in metabolic fitness, psychology and eating behavior, while at the same time effectively minimizing the attrition common in diet programs.
Cardiovascular effects of intensive lifestyle intervention in type 2 diabetes.
TLDR
An intensive lifestyle intervention focusing on weight loss did not reduce the rate of cardiovascular events in overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes.
Intentional Weight Loss and Longevity in Overweight Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Population-Based Cohort Study
TLDR
Successful therapeutic intentional weight loss, supervised by a doctor over six years, was not associated with reduced all-cause mortality or cardiovascular morbidity/mortality during the succeeding 13 years, suggesting the best prognosis for those who maintained their weight.
Weight Science: Evaluating the Evidence for a Paradigm Shift
TLDR
Randomized controlled clinical trials indicate that a HAES approach is associated with statistically and clinically relevant improvements in physiological measures, health behaviors, and psychosocial outcomes, and that HAES achieves these health outcomes more successfully than weight loss treatment and without the contraindications associated with a weight focus.
The Weight-Inclusive versus Weight-Normative Approach to Health: Evaluating the Evidence for Prioritizing Well-Being over Weight Loss
TLDR
Data support a weight-inclusive approach, which is included in models such as Health at Every Size for improving physical, behavioral, and psychological indices, as well as acceptability of public health messages.
...
...