A unified genealogy of modern and ancient genomes

@article{Wohns2021AUG,
  title={A unified genealogy of modern and ancient genomes},
  author={Anthony Wilder Wohns and Yan Wong and Ben Jeffery and Ali Akbari and Swapan Mallick and Ron Pinhasi and Nick J. Patterson and David Reich and Jerome Kelleher and Gil McVean},
  journal={bioRxiv},
  year={2021}
}
The sequencing of modern and ancient genomes from around the world has revolutionised our understanding of human history and evolution1,2. However, the general problem of how best to characterise the full complexity of ancestral relationships from the totality of human genomic variation remains unsolved. Patterns of variation in each data set are typically analysed independently, and often using parametric models or data reduction techniques that cannot capture the full complexity of human… 

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