A two-step theory and test of the oil curse: the conditional effect of oil on democratization

@article{Houle2018ATT,
  title={A two-step theory and test of the oil curse: the conditional effect of oil on democratization},
  author={C. Houle},
  journal={Democratization},
  year={2018},
  volume={25},
  pages={404 - 421}
}
  • C. Houle
  • Published 2018
  • Economics
  • Democratization
ABSTRACT Does oil impede democratization? This article posits that in order to understand the effect of oil on democratization one has to decompose the transition process into two steps: (1) the ending of the authoritarian regime, which initiates the process; and (2) the subsequent establishment of a democracy rather than an autocracy. I argue that oil has different effects on the two phases of the transition process: while oil has contradictory effects on the likelihood that an authoritarian… Expand
Revisiting the oil and democracy nexus : New evidence utilizing V-DEM democracy data in a GMM PVAR framework
This study re-examines the validity of oil-hinders-democracy hypothesis by comparing the long-term effects of oil abundance and oil dependence democracies individually. Based on five novel measuresExpand
The Two-step Model of Clustered Democratization
Does democratization diffuse? For over two decades, numerous studies have asserted that democratization diffuses across countries but recent research has challenged this claim. Most recently, work byExpand
New evidence on the oil-democracy nexus utilising the Varieties of Democracy data
Abstract This study re-examines the oil and democracy nexus, which is central to the political resource curse by applying the latest democracy dataset, V-DEM, into the analysis in a sample of 100Expand
Colonial origins of the resource curse: endogenous sovereignty and authoritarianism in Brunei
ABSTRACT The literature on the political “resource curse” has recently seen heated debates over the average causal effects of oil on democracy and the generalizability of the theory. One of theExpand
Working Paper 102
This study examines the role of autocratic ruling party strength in democratic transitions. While the impact of ruling party strength on regime stability is extensively studied, we know much lessExpand
Oil Wealth and Gender in Political and National Belonging
Oil-based economies drive a connection between national identity and support for patriarchal belonging. Oil wealthy nations ensure that both men and women are excluded from political participation,Expand
Survivorship Bias in Comparative Politics: Endogenous Sovereignty and the Resource Curse
Cross-national statistical research based on “all country” data sets involves no deliberate selection and hence ignores the potential for endogenous selection bias. We show that these designs areExpand
The Two-step Model of Clustered Democratization:
Does democratization diffuse? For over two decades, numerous studies have asserted that democratization diffuses across countries but recent research has challenged this claim. Most recently, work ...
Autocratic ruling parties during regime transitions: Investigating the democratizing effect of strong ruling parties
This research project was supported by Vetenskapsr adet, Grant 439-2014-38, PI: Ellen Lust, Univer- sity of Gotneburg, Sweden; by Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation to Wallenberg Academy Fellow PI:Expand
Venezuelan Oil and Political Instability : A Case Study of Venezuela and its Oil Dependency
The natural resource curse is a widely debated phenomenon usually proposing a connection between large extractive resource wealth and substandard economic performance. This paper concerns the conneExpand
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 78 REFERENCES
Does Oil Hinder Democracy?
Some scholars suggest that the Middle East's oil wealth helps explain its failure to democratize. This article examines three aspects of this "oil impedes democracy" claim. First, is it true? DoesExpand
The Contradiction of Modernization: A Conditional Model of Endogenous Democratization
Several very influential authors in political science and economics have recently argued that the relationship between economic development and democracy is extremely weak, spurious, or that theExpand
The Contradiction of Modernization: A Conditional Model of Endogenous Democratization
Several very influential authors in political science and economics have recently argued that the relationship between economic development and democracy is extremely weak, spurious, or that theExpand
Oil, Democracy, and Context
A considerable debate precludes drawing conclusions about oil’s effect on democracy. This article challenges this stalemate by significantly expanding the scope of the previous research and usingExpand
Oil Wealth and Regime Survival in the Developing World
The global oil market and its associated booms and busts have generated a large literature in political science. One contention in this literature is that political instability is a near-certain,Expand
Oil, Conflict, and Stability
According to existing literature, the presence of oil leads simultaneously to increased risk of civil conflict and exceptional regime stability. The seemingly contradictory nature of theseExpand
Refining the Oil Curse
Is there a resource curse? Some scholars argue that resource income is associated with slower transitions to democracy; others contend that the negative effects of resources are conditional onExpand
Oil and Democracy: Endogenous Natural Resources and the Political “Resource Curse”
Abstract By the end of the twentieth century, a scholarly consensus emerged around the idea that oil fuels authoritarianism and slow growth. The natural abundance once thought to be a blessing wasExpand
Inequality and Democracy: Why Inequality Harms Consolidation but Does Not Affect Democratization
Under what conditions do democracies emerge and consolidate? Recent theories suggest that inequality is among the leading determinants of both democratization and consolidation. By contrast, thisExpand
The Paradox of “Warlord” Democracy: A Theoretical Investigation
  • W. Leonard
  • Political Science
  • American Political Science Review
  • 2004
Political theorists from Machiavelli to Huntington have denied the possibility of popular government arising out of the chaos of civil war, instead prescribing an intermediate stage of one-man ruleExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...