A twisting story: how a single gene twists a snail? Mechanogenetics

@article{Kuroda2015ATS,
  title={A twisting story: how a single gene twists a snail? Mechanogenetics},
  author={Reiko Kuroda},
  journal={Quarterly Reviews of Biophysics},
  year={2015},
  volume={48},
  pages={445 - 452}
}
  • R. Kuroda
  • Published 16 July 2015
  • Biology
  • Quarterly Reviews of Biophysics
Abstract Left–right (l–r) symmetry breaking and the establishment of asymmetric animal body plan during embryonic development are fundamental questions in nature. The molecular basis of l–r symmetry breaking of snails is a fascinating topic as it is determined by a maternal single handedness-determining locus at a very early developmental stage. This perspective describes the current state of the art of the chiromorphogenesis, mainly based on our own work, i.e. the first step of l–r symmetry… 
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The pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis
The freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis has a long research history, but only relatively recently has it emerged as an attractive model organism to study molecular mechanisms in the areas of
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