A theory for cerebral neocortex

@article{Marr1970ATF,
  title={A theory for cerebral neocortex},
  author={D. Marr},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B. Biological Sciences},
  year={1970},
  volume={176},
  pages={161 - 234}
}
  • D. Marr
  • Published 3 November 1970
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B. Biological Sciences
It is proposed that the learning of many tasks by the cerebrum is based on using a very few fundamental techniques for organizing information. It is argued that this is made possible by the prevalence in the world of a particular kind of redundancy, which is characterized by a ‘Fundamental Hypothesis’. This hypothesisis used to found a theory of the basic operations which, it is proposed, are carried out by the cerebral neocortex. They involve the use of past experience to form so-called… 

David Marr: A Theory for Cerebral Neocortex

This paper is an important contribution to the understanding of the visual system, it contains a part of those ideas which have become the commonly accepted basis of current research. Although some

Marr's Theory of the Neocortex as a Self-Organizing Neural Network

Analysis of Marr's proposal for the functioning of the neocortex, together with results from computer simulations of different types of competitive learning mechanisms, suggests the presynaptic mechanism is best known in the computational neuroscience literature and may be a more suitable mechanism of competitiveLearning than those normally considered.

Simple memory: a theory for archicortex.

  • D. Marr
  • Biology
    Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
  • 1971
It is shown that rather general numerical constraints roughly determine the dimensions of memorizing models for the mammalian brain, and from these is derived a general model for archicortex.

The search of “canonical” explanations for the cerebral cortex

  • A. Plebe
  • Biology
    History and philosophy of the life sciences
  • 2018
The purpose of this paper is to analyze the search for canonical explanations over the past 40 years, discussing the theoretical frameworks informing this research, and highlighting a bias that has limited the success of this research project, that of overlooking the dimension of cortical development.

Hocus-Socus: An Error Catastrophe for Complex Hebbian Learning Implies Neocortical Proofreading

It is reported that in single model neurons learning from hocs fails, and defaults to socs, if nonlinear Hebbian rules are not sufficiently connection-specific, and would undermine biological connectionism.

A model of visual development

A model based on the evidence is proposed that will explain some aspects of the developmental process in the visual cortex that can be altered by visual experiences during a certain period at an early age.

Constraints on the nature of the neural representation of the visual world

Understanding the perception of all but the most impoverished and artificial scenes presents a different (and likely far greater) kind of challenge than understanding face recognition, reading, or

The development of topography in the visual cortex: a review of models.

This article reviews the models of topographic organization in the visual cortex in a roughly historical sequence, beginning with von der Malsburg's paper 1973 paper in Kybernetik on self-organization of orientation selectivity.

The relative advantages of sparse versus distributed encoding for associative neuronal networks in the brain

The extent to which this statement is valid in general is discussed here, by considering some simple formal models of associative memory which include different neurobiological constraints.
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 48 REFERENCES

Simple memory: a theory for archicortex.

  • D. Marr
  • Biology
    Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
  • 1971
It is shown that rather general numerical constraints roughly determine the dimensions of memorizing models for the mammalian brain, and from these is derived a general model for archicortex.

Cortico-thalamic organization and memory

  • W. K. Taylor
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B. Biological Sciences
  • 1964
The results demonstrate that the initial effects of imperfections may be overcome by adequate training that only involves small percentage physical changes in the state of the memory.

Superimposed random coding of stimulus-response connections.

  • P. Greene
  • Computer Science
    The Bulletin of mathematical biophysics
  • 1965
Whether very simple structures and patterns of reinforcement would be adequate to carry out useful information processing in the brain are learned, and some conceivable functions of simple neural networks are shown which the experimenter might keep in mind.

Nerve net models of plausible size that perform many simple learning tasks

  • G. Brindley
  • Biology, Computer Science
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B. Biological Sciences
  • 1969
It is suggested that the models proposed are likely to be the most economical possible for their tasks, components and constructional constraints, and that any others that approach them in economy must share with them certain observable features, in particular an abundance of cells with many independent inputs and low thresholds.

Receptive fields, binocular interaction and functional architecture in the cat's visual cortex

This method is used to examine receptive fields of a more complex type and to make additional observations on binocular interaction and this approach is necessary in order to understand the behaviour of individual cells, but it fails to deal with the problem of the relationship of one cell to its neighbours.

A theory of cerebellar cortex

  • D. Marr
  • Biology, Psychology
    The Journal of physiology
  • 1969
1. A detailed theory of cerebellar cortex is proposed whose consequence is that the cerebellum learns to perform motor skills. Two forms of input—output relation are described, both consistent with

THE USE OF DEGENERATION METHODS IN THE INVESTIGATION OF SHORT NEURONAL CONNEXIONS.

Some problems and methods in statistical archaeology

I. Statistical archaeology, like so many branches of applied mathematics, was not invented by mathematicians. It may be thought reasonable to ascribe its invention to Flinders Petrie (I899), for it