A theoretical foundation for multi-scale regular vegetation patterns

@article{Tarnita2017ATF,
  title={A theoretical foundation for multi-scale regular vegetation patterns},
  author={Corina E. Tarnita and Juan A. Bonachela and Efrat Sheffer and Jennifer A. Guyton and Tyler C. Coverdale and Ryan A. Long and Robert M. Pringle},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2017},
  volume={541},
  pages={398-401}
}
Self-organized regular vegetation patterns are widespread and thought to mediate ecosystem functions such as productivity and robustness, but the mechanisms underlying their origin and maintenance remain disputed. Particularly controversial are landscapes of overdispersed (evenly spaced) elements, such as North American Mima mounds, Brazilian murundus, South African heuweltjies, and, famously, Namibian fairy circles. Two competing hypotheses are currently debated. On the one hand, models of… 

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