A test of the dear enemy phenomenon in the Eurasian beaver

@article{Rosell2002ATO,
  title={A test of the dear enemy phenomenon in the Eurasian beaver},
  author={Frank Rosell and Tore Bj{\o}rk{\o}yli},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2002},
  volume={63},
  pages={1073-1078}
}
Abstract We tested the hypothesis that Eurasian beavers, Castor fiber, display the dear enemy phenomenon; that is, they respond less aggressively to intrusions by their territorial neighbours than to intrusions by nonterritorial floaters (strangers). This ability could be advantageous in facilitating differential treatment of wandering strangers versus established neighbours. Territorial beavers were presented with scent from neighbouring and stranger adult males. Thirty-nine different active… 

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