A tertiary plastid uses genes from two endosymbionts.

@article{Patron2006ATP,
  title={A tertiary plastid uses genes from two endosymbionts.},
  author={Nicola J. Patron and Ross F. Waller and Patrick J. Keeling},
  journal={Journal of molecular biology},
  year={2006},
  volume={357 5},
  pages={
          1373-82
        }
}

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