A tale of two snails: is the cure worse than the disease?

@article{Civeyrel2004ATO,
  title={A tale of two snails: is the cure worse than the disease?},
  author={Laure Civeyrel and Daniel Simberloff},
  journal={Biodiversity \& Conservation},
  year={2004},
  volume={5},
  pages={1231-1252}
}
The giant African snail, Achatina fulica, has been introduced to many parts of Asia as well as to numerous islands in the Indian and Pacific Ocean, and has recently reached the West Indies. It has been widely decried as a disaster to agricultural economies and a threat to human health, leading to a clamor for the introduction of biological control agents. In fact, the lasting impact on agriculture may not be severe, and the human health risk is probably minor. This snail can be an aesthetic… Expand
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