A tale of culture-bound regime evolution: the centennial democratic trend and its recent reversal

@article{Brunkert2018ATO,
  title={A tale of culture-bound regime evolution: the centennial democratic trend and its recent reversal},
  author={Lennart Brunkert and Stefanie Kruse and Christian Welzel},
  journal={Democratization},
  year={2018},
  volume={26},
  pages={422 - 443}
}
ABSTRACT Using a new measure of “comprehensive democracy,” our analysis traces the global democratic trend over the last 116 years, from 1900 until 2016, looking in particular at the centennial trend’s cultural zoning. As it turns out, democracy has been proceeding and continues to differentiate the world’s nations in a strongly culture-bound manner: high levels of democracy remain a distinctive feature of nations in which emancipative values have grown strong over the generations. By the same… 

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