A systematic review of the serotonergic effects of mirtazapine in humans: implications for its dual action status

@article{Gillman2006ASR,
  title={A systematic review of the serotonergic effects of mirtazapine in humans: implications for its dual action status},
  author={P. Gillman},
  journal={Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental},
  year={2006},
  volume={21}
}
  • P. Gillman
  • Published 2006
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental
A systematic review of published work concerning mirtazapine was undertaken to assess possible evidence of serotonergic effects or serotonin toxicity (ST) in humans, because drug toxicity and interaction data from human over‐doses is an useful source of information about the nature and potency of drug effects. There is a paucity of evidence for mirtazapine having effects on any indicator of serotonin elevation, which leads to an emphasis on ST as an important line of evidence. Mirtazapine is… Expand
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