A systematic review of the effects of antipsychotic drugs on brain volume

@article{Moncrieff2010ASR,
  title={A systematic review of the effects of antipsychotic drugs on brain volume},
  author={Joanna Moncrieff and Jonathan Leo},
  journal={Psychological Medicine},
  year={2010},
  volume={40},
  pages={1409 - 1422}
}
Background People with schizophrenia are often found to have smaller brains and larger brain ventricles than normal, but the role of antipsychotic medication remains unclear. Method We conducted a systematic review of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. We included longitudinal studies of brain changes in patients taking antipsychotic drugs and we examined studies of antipsychotic-naive patients for comparison purposes. Results Fourteen out of 26 longitudinal studies showed a decline in… 
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