A systematic review of enhanced cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-E) for eating disorders.

@article{Atwood2019ASR,
  title={A systematic review of enhanced cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-E) for eating disorders.},
  author={Molly E Atwood and Aliza Friedman},
  journal={The International journal of eating disorders},
  year={2019}
}
OBJECTIVE To review the literature examining the efficacy and effectiveness of enhanced cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-E) for adults and older adolescents with eating disorders. METHOD A systematic search of the literature (using PsycINFO and PubMed) was conducted in order to identify relevant publications (randomized controlled trials [RCTs] and uncontrolled trials) up to June 2019. Effect sizes were reported for outcomes including treatment attrition and remission rates, eating disorder… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
There is evidence to support the use of CBT-E for the treatment of EDs; however, this evidence is tentative as CBT -E is still in its early phases of empirical testing.
The effectiveness of enhanced cognitive behavioural therapy for eating disorders: an open trial.
TLDR
Overall, the findings indicated that CBT-E results in significant improvements, in both eating and more general psychopathology, in patients with all eating disorders attending an outpatient clinic.
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TLDR
It is demonstrated that a group version of CBT-E can be effective at reducing eating disorder psychopathology in a transdiagnostic sample of individuals with eating disorders.
Enhanced cognitive behavioural therapy for patients with eating disorders: a systematic review
TLDR
There is robust evidence that CBT-E is an effective treatment for patients with an eating disorder, however, more studies on differential effects and working mechanisms are required to establish the specificity of CBt-E.
Treatment outcome research of enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy for eating disorders: a systematic review with narrative and meta-analytic synthesis
TLDR
A large, statistically significant effect supported CBT-E as a treatment for all EDs, and narrative exploration indicated this endeavour would be worthwhile, despite the limitations.
Dropout from cognitive‐behavioral therapy for eating disorders: A meta‐analysis of randomized, controlled trials
TLDR
This meta-analysis highlights the urgency for RCTs to utilize a standardized dropout definition and to report as much information on patient dropout as possible, so that strategies designed to minimize dropout can be developed, and factors predictive of CBT dropouts can be more easily identified.
Motivation-focused treatment for eating disorders: a sequential trial of enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy with and without preceding motivation-focused therapy.
TLDR
In this sample, MFT + CBT-E was not associated with superior treatment outcome when compared with CBT-E as usual, and the MFT phase was associated with significant increases in readiness to change.
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TLDR
It is indicated that CBT-E is an effective treatment for adults with all eating disorders within out-patient settings, however, minimizing drop-out appears to be an important consideration when implementing CBt-E within clinical settings.
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TLDR
There is potential for using MI in the field of eating disorders, particularly with respect to 'readiness for change', but more homogeneity in study design and delivery of MI is needed along with some markers of treatment fidelity, including information as to how adherence to the intervention is assured.
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa and Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified: Translation from Randomized Controlled Trial to a Clinical Setting
TLDR
Findings support dissemination of CBT-E in this context, with significant improvements in eating disorder psychopathology, compared to previous studies.
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