A systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between vitamin A intake, serum vitamin A, and risk of liver cancer

@article{Leelakanok2018ASR,
  title={A systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between vitamin A intake, serum vitamin A, and risk of liver cancer},
  author={Nattawut Leelakanok and Ronilda R D'Cunha and Grerk Sutamtewagul and Marin L. Schweizer},
  journal={Nutrition and Health},
  year={2018},
  volume={24},
  pages={121 - 131}
}
Background: Previous evidence supports that vitamin A decreases the risk of several types of cancer. However, the association between vitamin A and liver cancer is inconclusive. Aim: This systematic review and meta-analysis summarizes the existing literature, discussing the association between vitamin A intake, serum vitamin A, and liver cancer in adult populations. Methods: A systematic literature review was performed by searching the EMBASE, PubMed, Scopus and International Pharmaceutical… 

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