A systematic, large-scale study of synaesthesia: implications for the role of early experience in lexical-colour associations

@article{Rich2005ASL,
  title={A systematic, large-scale study of synaesthesia: implications for the role of early experience in lexical-colour associations},
  author={Anina N. Rich and J. L. Bradshaw and Jason B. Mattingley},
  journal={Cognition},
  year={2005},
  volume={98},
  pages={53-84}
}
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