A syntactic rule in forest monkey communication

@article{Zuberbhler2002ASR,
  title={A syntactic rule in forest monkey communication},
  author={K. Zuberb{\"u}hler},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2002},
  volume={63},
  pages={293-299}
}
Abstract Syntactic rules allow a speaker to combine signals with existing meanings to create an infinite number of new meanings. Even though combinatory rules have also been found in some animal communication systems, they have never been clearly linked to concurrent changes in meaning. The present field experiment indicates that wild Diana monkeys, Cercopithecus diana, may comprehend the semantic changes caused by a combinatory rule present in the natural communication of another primate, the… Expand

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