A survey of honey bee colony losses in the United States, fall 2008 to spring 2009

@article{vanEngelsdorp2010ASO,
  title={A survey of honey bee colony losses in the United States, fall 2008 to spring 2009},
  author={Dennis vanEngelsdorp and Jerry Hayes and Robyn M. Underwood and Jeffery S. Pettis},
  journal={Journal of Apicultural Research},
  year={2010},
  volume={49},
  pages={14 - 7}
}
Summary This study records the third consecutive year of high winter losses in managed honey bee colonies in the USA. Over the winter of 2008–9 an estimated 29% of all US colonies died. Operations which pollinated Californian almond orchards over the survey period had lower average losses than those which did not. Beekeepers consider normal losses to be 17.6%, and 57.9% of all responding beekeepers suffered losses greater than that which they considered to be acceptable. The proportion of… 

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