A summary of research investigating echolocation abilities of blind and sighted humans

@article{Kolarik2014ASO,
  title={A summary of research investigating echolocation abilities of blind and sighted humans},
  author={Andrew J. Kolarik and Silvia Cirstea and Shahina Pardhan and Brian C. J. Moore},
  journal={Hearing Research},
  year={2014},
  volume={310},
  pages={60-68}
}

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