A sulfur-based survival strategy for putative phototrophic life in the venusian atmosphere.

@article{SchulzeMakuch2004ASS,
  title={A sulfur-based survival strategy for putative phototrophic life in the venusian atmosphere.},
  author={Dirk Schulze-Makuch and David Harry Grinspoon and Ousama H Abbas and Louis N. Irwin and Mark Alan Bullock},
  journal={Astrobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={4 1},
  pages={
          11-8
        }
}
Several observations indicate that the cloud deck of the venusian atmosphere may provide a plausible refuge for microbial life. Having originated in a hot proto-ocean or been brought in by meteorites from Earth (or Mars), early life on Venus could have adapted to a dry, acidic atmospheric niche as the warming planet lost its oceans. The greatest obstacle for the survival of any organism in this niche may be high doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Here we make the argument that such an… Expand

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