A subset of octopaminergic neurons are important for Drosophila aggression

@article{Zhou2008ASO,
  title={A subset of octopaminergic neurons are important for Drosophila aggression},
  author={Chuan Zhou and Yong Rao and Yi Rao},
  journal={Nature Neuroscience},
  year={2008},
  volume={11},
  pages={1059-1067}
}
Aggression is an innate behavior that is important for animal survival and evolution. We examined the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying aggression in Drosophila. Reduction of the neurotransmitter octopamine, the insect equivalent of norepinephrine, decreased aggression in both males and females. Mutants lacking octopamine did not initiate fighting and did not fight other flies, although they still provoked other flies to fight themselves. Mutant males lost to the wild-type males in… 

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