A study of soil methane sink regulation in two grasslands exposed to drought and N fertilization

@article{Hartmann2010ASO,
  title={A study of soil methane sink regulation in two grasslands exposed to drought and N fertilization},
  author={A. Hartmann and Nina Buchmann and Pascal Alex Niklaus},
  journal={Plant and Soil},
  year={2010},
  volume={342},
  pages={265-275}
}
Oxidation by soil bacteria is the only biological sink for atmospheric methane (CH4). There are substantial uncertainties regarding the global size of this sink, in part because the ecological controls of the involved processes are not well understood to date. We have investigated effects of severe summer drought and of nitrogen inputs (ammonium nitrate or cattle urine) on soil CH4 fluxes in a field experiment. Soil moisture was the most important factor regulating the temporal dynamics of CH4… 
Interactive effects of drought and N fertilization on the spatial distribution of methane assimilation in grassland soils
Soil methanotrophic bacteria constitute the only globally relevant biological sink for atmospheric methane (CH4). Nitrogen (N) fertilizers as well as soil moisture regime affect the activity of these
Effects of simulated drought and nitrogen fertilizer on plant productivity and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions of two pastures
AimsAs a consequence of global climate change, increases in the frequencies and severities of drought are anticipated for many parts of the world. Soil moisture and nitrogen (N) are among the major
Effects of drought and N-fertilization on N cycling in two grassland soils
TLDR
These interactive effects differed between processes of the soil N cycle, suggesting that the spatial heterogeneity in pastures needs to be taken into account when predicting changes in N cycling and associated N2O emissions in a changing climate.
Erratum to: Effects of drought and N-fertilization on N cycling in two grassland soils
TLDR
These interactive effects differed between processes of the soil N cycle, suggesting that the spatial heterogeneity in pastures needs to be taken into account when predicting changes in N cycling and associated N2O emissions in a changing climate.
Soil methane oxidation in both dry and wet temperate eucalypt forests shows a near-identical relationship with soil air-filled porosity
Abstract. Well-drained, aerated soils are important sinks for atmospheric methane (CH4) via the process of CH4 oxidation by methane-oxidising bacteria (MOB). This terrestrial CH4 sink may contribute
Plant species diversity affects soil–atmosphere fluxes of methane and nitrous oxide
TLDR
It is indicated that plant species richness increased soil moisture, which in turn increased N cycling-related activities, which increased N2O emission and soil CH4 uptake, with the latter possibly caused by removal of inhibitory ammonium by nitrification.
Drought-induced reduction in methane fluxes and its hydrothermal sensitivity in alpine peatland
TLDR
A better understanding of the extreme drought effects on CH4 fluxes of alpine peatland, and their hydrothermal impact factors, is provided, which provides a reliable reference for peat land protection and management.
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