A statistical approach to latitude measurements: Ptolemy's and Riccioli's geographical works as case studies

@article{Santoro2017ASA,
  title={A statistical approach to latitude measurements: Ptolemy's and Riccioli's geographical works as case studies},
  author={Luca Santoro},
  journal={History of Geo- and Space Sciences},
  year={2017},
  volume={8},
  pages={69-77}
}
  • L. Santoro
  • Published 7 August 2017
  • Sociology, Geography, Physics
  • History of Geo- and Space Sciences
Abstract. The aim of this work is to analyze latitude measurements typically used in historical geographical works through a statistical approach. We use two sets of different age as case studies: Ptolemy's Geography and Riccioli's work on geography. A statistical approach to historical latitude and longitude databases can reveal systematic errors in geographical georeferencing processes. On the other hand, once exploiting the right statistical analysis, this approach can also lead to new… 
1 Citations

The structure of space in Ptolemy’s Geography: methodological challenges in georeferencing ancient toponyms

  • D. Shcheglov
  • Physics
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  • 2019
In this paper I would like to draw attention to several features inherent to Ptolemy’s Geography that limit the effectiveness of different mathematical approaches to georeferencing (i.e. locating

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