A species-level supertree of Crocodyliformes

@article{Bronzati2012ASS,
  title={A species-level supertree of Crocodyliformes},
  author={Mario Bronzati and Felipe Chinaglia Montefeltro and Max Cardoso Langer},
  journal={Historical Biology},
  year={2012},
  volume={24},
  pages={598 - 606}
}
With fossils found worldwide, Crocodyliformes stands as one of the best documented vertebrates over the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. The multiple phylogenetic hypotheses of relationship proposed for the group allow plenty of space for contentious results, partially due to the small overlapping of taxa and disagreeing homology statements among studies. We present two supertrees of Crocodyliformes, based on different protocols of source tree selection, summarising phylogenetic data for the group into a… Expand
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