A spatial explicit strategy reduces error but interferes with sensorimotor adaptation.

@article{Benson2011ASE,
  title={A spatial explicit strategy reduces error but interferes with sensorimotor adaptation.},
  author={Bryan L. Benson and Joaquin A. Anguera and Rachael D. Seidler},
  journal={Journal of neurophysiology},
  year={2011},
  volume={105 6},
  pages={2843-51}
}
Although sensorimotor adaptation is typically thought of as an implicit form of learning, it has been shown that participants who gain explicit awareness of the nature of the perturbation during adaptation exhibit more learning than those who do not. With rare exceptions, however, explicit awareness is typically polled at the end of the study. Here, we provided participants with either an explicit spatial strategy or no instructions before learning. Early in learning, explicit instructions… CONTINUE READING

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