A spatial analysis of genetic structure of human populations in China reveals distinct difference between maternal and paternal lineages

@article{Xue2008ASA,
  title={A spatial analysis of genetic structure of human populations in China reveals distinct difference between maternal and paternal lineages},
  author={Fuzhong Xue and Yi Wang and Shuhua Xu and Feng Zhang and Bo Wen and Xuesen Wu and Ming Lu and Ranjan Deka and Ji Qian and Li-Rong Jin},
  journal={European Journal of Human Genetics},
  year={2008},
  volume={16},
  pages={705-717}
}
Analyses of archeological, anatomical, linguistic, and genetic data suggested consistently the presence of a significant boundary between the populations of north and south in China. However, the exact location and the strength of this boundary have remained controversial. In this study, we systematically explored the spatial genetic structure and the boundary of north–south division of human populations using mtDNA data in 91 populations and Y-chromosome data in 143 populations. Our results… 
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