A social perspective on the introduction of exotic animals: the case of the chicken

@article{Sykes2012ASP,
  title={A social perspective on the introduction of exotic animals: the case of the chicken},
  author={N. Sykes},
  journal={World Archaeology},
  year={2012},
  volume={44},
  pages={158 - 169}
}
  • N. Sykes
  • Published 2012
  • History
  • World Archaeology
Abstract Studies of animal introductions have traditionally been the preserve of ecologists and natural historians but here it is argued that exotic species are a rich source of cultural evidence with the potential to enhance archaeological interpretations relating to human behaviour and beliefs. This paper focuses on the domestic fowl (Gallus gallus), a native of East Asia that spread across Europe during the Neolithic to Iron Age and became well established by the end of the Roman period… Expand
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