A single g factor is not necessary to simulate positive correlations between cognitive tests.

@article{McFarland2012ASG,
  title={A single g factor is not necessary to simulate positive correlations between cognitive tests.},
  author={Dennis J. McFarland},
  journal={Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology},
  year={2012},
  volume={34 4},
  pages={
          378-84
        }
}
In the area of abilities testing, one issue of continued dissent is whether abilities are best conceptualized as manifestations of a single underlying general factor or as reflecting the combination of multiple traits that may be dissociable. The fact that diverse cognitive tests tend to be positively correlated has been taken as evidence for a single general ability or "g" factor. In the present study, simulations of test performance were run to evaluate the hypothesis that multiple… CONTINUE READING
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