A single dominant gene can account for eye tracking dysfunctions and schizophrenia in offspring of discordant twins.

@article{Holzman1988ASD,
  title={A single dominant gene can account for eye tracking dysfunctions and schizophrenia in offspring of discordant twins.},
  author={Philip S. Holzman and Einar Kringlen and Steven Matthysse and Steven D. Flanagan and Richard B. Lipton and G. Cramer and S. A. Levin and Kezia Lange and Deborah L. Levy},
  journal={Archives of general psychiatry},
  year={1988},
  volume={45 7},
  pages={641-7}
}
Eye movement dysfunctions (EMDs), detectable during smooth pursuit, occur in a majority of schizophrenics and in 45% of their first-degree relatives. Previous data suggest that they represent a biologic marker for schizophrenia. To determine the mode of transmission of the schizophrenia-EMD complex, the eye movements of offspring of monozygotic and dizygotic twins were recorded. One group of twins was discordant for schizophrenia; the other group for manic depression or reactive psychosis. The… CONTINUE READING

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