A single domestication for maize shown by multilocus microsatellite genotyping

@article{Matsuoka2002ASD,
  title={A single domestication for maize shown by multilocus microsatellite genotyping},
  author={Y. Matsuoka and Y. Vigouroux and M. Goodman and G. J.Sanchez and E. Buckler and J. Doebley},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2002},
  volume={99},
  pages={6080 - 6084}
}
There exists extraordinary morphological and genetic diversity among the maize landraces that have been developed by pre-Columbian cultivators. To explain this high level of diversity in maize, several authors have proposed that maize landraces were the products of multiple independent domestications from their wild relative (teosinte). We present phylogenetic analyses based on 264 individual plants, each genotyped at 99 microsatellites, that challenge the multiple-origins hypothesis. Instead… Expand
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