A second enantiornithean (Aves: Ornithothoraces) wing from the Early Cretaceous Xiagou Formation near Changma, Gansu Province, People's Republic of China

@article{Harris2006ASE,
  title={A second enantiornithean (Aves: Ornithothoraces) wing from the Early Cretaceous Xiagou Formation near Changma, Gansu Province, People's Republic of China},
  author={Jerald D. Harris and Matthew C. Lamanna and Hailu You and Shu-an Ji and Qiang Ji},
  journal={Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences},
  year={2006},
  volume={43},
  pages={547-554}
}
A new specimen of an enantiornithean bird from the Lower Cretaceous Xiagou Formation of Gansu Province, northwestern China, consists of an articulated distal left humerus, ulna, radius, carpus, and manus. The specimen may represent a primitive enantiornithean because it lacks a longitudinal sulcus on the radius, has incompletely fused alular and major metacarpals, and possibly retains a remnant of a second phalanx on the minor digit. It differs from all other known enantiornitheans, and… 

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