A role for central vasopressin in pair bonding in monogamous prairie voles

@article{Winslow1993ARF,
  title={A role for central vasopressin in pair bonding in monogamous prairie voles},
  author={J. Winslow and Nick Hastings and C. Carter and C. R. Harbaugh and T. Insel},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1993},
  volume={365},
  pages={545-548}
}
MONOGAMOUS social organization is characterized by selective affiliation with a partner, high levels of paternal behaviour and, in many species, intense aggression towards strangers for defence of territory, nest and mate1,2. Although much has been written about the evolutionary causes of monogamy, little is known about the proximate mechanisms for pair bonding in monogamous mammals2,3. The prairie vole, Microtus ochrogaster, is a monogamous, biparental rodent which exhibits long-term pair… Expand
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