A review of the epidemiology of tinea unguium in the community

@article{Gill1999ARO,
  title={A review of the epidemiology of tinea unguium in the community},
  author={David Gill and Robin Marks},
  journal={Australasian Journal of Dermatology},
  year={1999},
  volume={40}
}
  • D. Gill, R. Marks
  • Published 1 February 1999
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Australasian Journal of Dermatology
Tinea unguium is a common, chronic fungal infection of the nails. Many epidemiological studies have looked at the frequency with which this condition is seen in hospital outpatients clinics or mycological laboratories along with other dermatomycoses. Only recently have studies begun to emerge looking at the prevalence of this condition in populations. Hospital and mycological laboratory‐based studies give valuable information about tinea unguium prevalence in a particular clinic, but cannot be… 
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