A review of the dodo and its ecosystem: insights from a vertebrate concentration Lagerstätte in Mauritius

@article{Rijsdijk2015ARO,
  title={A review of the dodo and its ecosystem: insights from a vertebrate concentration Lagerst{\"a}tte in Mauritius},
  author={Kenneth F. Rijsdijk and Julian P. Hume and Perry G. B. de Louw and Hanneke J. M. Meijer and Anwar Janoo and Erik J. de Boer and Lorna Steel and John de Vos and Laura van der Sluis and Henry Hooghiemstra and François Benjamin Vincent Florens and Cl{\'a}udia Baider and Tamara J. J. Vernimmen and Pieter Baas and Anneke H. van Heteren and Vikash Rupear and Gorah Beebeejaun and Alan Grihault and Johannes van der Plicht and Maria Besselink and Juli{\"e}n K. Lubeek and M. N. Jansen and Sjoerd J. Kluiving and Hege Ingjerd Hollund and Beth Shapiro and Matthew James Collins and Mike Buckley and Ranjith M. Jayasena and Nicolas Porch and Rene Floore and FRANS P. M. Bunnik and Andrew Biedlingmaier and Jennifer Leavitt and Gregory Monfette and Anna Kimelblatt and Adrienne Randall and Pieter Floore and Leon P. A. M. Claessens},
  journal={Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology},
  year={2015},
  volume={35},
  pages={20 - 3}
}
ABSTRACT The dodo Raphus cucullatus Linnaeus, 1758, an extinct and flightless, giant pigeon endemic to Mauritius, has fascinated people since its discovery, yet has remained surprisingly poorly known. Until the mid-19th century, almost all that was known about the dodo was based on illustrations and written accounts by 17th century mariners, often of questionable accuracy. Furthermore, only a few fragmentary remains of dodos collected prior to the bird's extinction exist. Our understanding of… 
Preface
One could look at the story of the dodo (Raphus cucullatus) as a series of tragedies, a Shakespearean play that climaxes with an ecological disaster initiated by seafarers, and the invasive species
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References

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TLDR
The literature on dodos and solitaires is large and sprawling and concerns such things as nautical history and postRenaissance art as much as ornithology and the accession records of natural history collections.
Rediscovery of a lost Lagerstätte: a comparative analysis of the historical and recent Mare aux Songes dodo excavations on Mauritius
The Mare aux Songes (MAS), Mauritius, Mascarene Islands, is best known for the remarkable quality and quantity of macro- and micro-fossil remains, including those of the iconic Dodo Raphus
Dodo remains from an in situ context from Mare aux Songes, Mauritius
TLDR
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The isolated Mascarene Islands of Mauritius, Réunion and Rodrigues are situated in the southwestern Indian Ocean. All are volcanic in origin and have never been connected to each other or any other
The Morphology of the Thirioux dodos
TLDR
The skeletal anatomy of two exceptional dodo specimens collected by amateur naturalist Louis Etienne Thirioux in the caves and crevasses surrounding Le Pouce supports recent reinterpretations of the dodo as a resilient bird that was well adapted to the Mauritian ecosystem.
Fight club: a unique weapon in the wing of the solitaire, Pezophaps solitaria (Aves: Columbidae), an extinct flightless bird from Rodrigues, Mascarene Islands
TLDR
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More has been written about the iconic Dodo Raphus cucullatus of Mauritius than any other extinct bird, yet despite its familiarity, only a few specimens were exported from Mauritius; individual
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This paper describes a morphological study of the dodo Raphus cucullatus and solitaire Pezophaps solitaria extinct, flightless Columbiformes of the Mascarene Islands, Indian Ocean—based on mensural
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