A review of recent freshwater dinoflagellate cysts: taxonomy, phylogeny, ecology and palaeocology

@article{Mertens2012ARO,
  title={A review of recent freshwater dinoflagellate cysts: taxonomy, phylogeny, ecology and palaeocology},
  author={K. Mertens and K. Rengefors and {\O}. Moestrup and M. Ellegaard},
  journal={Phycologia},
  year={2012},
  volume={51},
  pages={612 - 619}
}
Mertens K.N., Rengefors K., Moestrup Ø. and Ellegaard M. 2012. A review of recent freshwater dinoflagellate cysts: taxonomy, phylogeny, ecology and palaeocology. Phycologia 51: 612–619. DOI: 10.2216/11-89.1 Resting stages (e.g. cysts) play an important role in the life history and ecology of phytoplankton, e.g. the survival, reproduction, genetic recombination, and dispersal of many species. Marine dinoflagellates cysts have been intensively studied by both geologists and biologists, but… Expand
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