A retrospective review of mortality in lorises and pottos in North American zoos, 1980-2010

@article{Fuller2014ARR,
  title={A retrospective review of mortality in lorises and pottos in North American zoos, 1980-2010},
  author={G. Fuller and K. Lukas and C. Kuhar and P. Dennis},
  journal={Endangered Species Research},
  year={2014},
  volume={23},
  pages={205-217}
}
Patterns of mortality in captive animals can reveal potentially problematic care prac- tices or other risk factors that may negatively impact animal health and population sustainability. We reviewed death records (necropsy and/or histopathology reports) for 367 lorises and pottos born between 1980 and 2010 that were housed in 33 North American zoos and related facilities. Our sample included 20 Loris tardigradus nordicus, 72 L. t. tardigradus, 109 Nycticebus coucang, 133 N. pygmaeus, and 33… Expand

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